How to clean your home properly

Who doesn’t want to live in a clean home? Of course, we all do. But are you properly cleaning the house you live in?

I learned a thing or two from Dyson, which recently shared its annual global dust study that investigates cleaning habits and behaviors to help understand household dust and its potential impact on our wellbeing.

The study, undertaken by 32,282 respondents from 33 countries around the world, revealed that 95% of people in the Philippines are cleaning just as much, if not more than they did last year (2021) to ensure their homes remain a clean and healthy space as many continue to be concerned about the cleanliness of their homes as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, 38% of people are only motivated to clean when their home is dusty or visible dust and dirt are on the floor, compared to 40% globally.

As alluded to, the biggest red flag the company raised was how often we clean our spaces. Are you the type of person who only cleans when you see visible dust in your home, or do you clean on a schedule?

If you aren’t cleaning on a schedule, you should start now. Dyson, known for its high-tech vacuums, recommends you vacuum at least once a week. And there is actually an order you should follow for cleaning your home. Dyson said you should start with vacuuming. The company believes this is the most effective way to remove dust.

You can still do wet cleaning on your surfaces, like using mops and rags but start with a vacuum. Monika Stuczen, a research scientist in microbiology at Dyson, said in a statement that if you dampen dust on floors or surfaces, “you’re creating a habitat more favorable to dust mite and mold proliferation.”

Sweeping will also just make the dust airborne, so remember to start vacuuming first. And, of course, you should clean from top to bottom. You also shouldn’t vacuum in a back-and-forth manner. Instead, you should move it in one direction because you might just be putting the dust back onto your floors or surfaces if you go back and forth. (That’s a bad habit I personally have to get rid of, too.)

You also shouldn’t overlook these pieces of furniture you frequently use: the sofa and your bed. Dyson said more people are vacuuming these commonly overlooked spaces. Still, this is your reminder to clean these out if you aren’t doing this yet.

Mattresses and sofas can be hotbeds of microscopic life, like dust mites and their feces, bacteria, viruses, pollen, and other allergens. If you let pets on your bed, that’s also another reason to clean them regularly.

According to Dyson, the dust mites themselves aren’t harmful. You should be concerned with their fecal matter, so you must clean or vacuum your mattresses and sofas every two to three months.

If you have a Dyson vacuum like the V12 Detect Slim we tried out, the tools you can use for cleaning out your mattresses and sofas are: 

  • mini motorized tool 
  • fabric and mattress tool
  • hair screw tool

When asked about steam cleaning, a Dyson rep told us during the briefing that it should be fine to use that. But the problem with steam cleaning is that some people won’t let these mattresses dry correctly, which could allow bacteria and mold to build up inside. So if you’re going this route, make sure to air out those mattresses properly.

Another often ignored area in your home is pet baskets or beds. Dyson wants to debunk the misconception that pet hair triggers allergies. It’s actually pet dander that typically does that. Even if you regularly groom your pet, microscopic particles (like food residue, dust mite feces, viruses, bacteria, and skin flakes) can remain on them. And that could potentially spread in your home, so remember to clean out your pet’s beds regularly.


What cleaning tips do you swear by? We’re starting this new Life Upgrade series here on LiTT because tech isn’t the only area in your life you should improve. Let us know on social media what else you want to see!